The writing process-words, imagery, outline… huh?

outline

 

Upper Rubber Boot interviewed me about my writing process! Here is a little bit of that interview:

1. What is your writing process?

If you’d asked me that question ten years ago, I would’ve said that I collect words. I wrote only poetry at that time so my focus was on imagery and metaphor. When I had enough words, I formed them into a poem.

Five years ago I would’ve said I think of a theme (astronomy, clouds, angels) and go from there. Three years ago I’d have told you that I write an outline, then work on a book chapter by chapter.

Now that I’m focusing so much on novel-writing, I begin with my characters. I give them names and a history and something that affected them greatly in their past. When I’ve figured out who they are, I put them into a situation of conflict. The characters decide where to go from there.

2. What’s some writing advice you’ve received, that works for you?

Just keep writing. I don’t recall hearing this at some point in time and having some sort of realization. Rather, it’s the advice that everyone says over and over again. The more you write, the better you get at it. It takes a long time to grow comfortable with your voice. If you want to improve your skill, the only way to do it is through practice.

If you want to read the rest, click here: Upper Rubber Boot, Intermittent Visitors – a multi-author blog tour

I’ve been interviewed… by my heroine Emily

Ever wonder what your characters think of you? I do. For a change of pace, I decided to ask Emily to interview me. Here is a taste of how it went:

Emily: Why did you think giving me this weird power would be cool?

Christine: Manipulating matter is the superpower I wish I had. I thought it would be fun if you could put your hand through a wall or reshape a piece of metal. Think of the possibilities! You can make jewelry, you can hide at parties, you can play tricks on your friends…

Emily: Yeah, it’s really not that cool. It kind of freaked me out when I was little, you know?

Christine: Well, your ability saved your life, didn’t it?

Emily: Hmmm. True. Even so, it’s kind of weird. I accidentally put my thumb through my phone once. That sucked.

Christine: Oops. Sorry about that. You figured out how to fix it though.

Emily: Yeah, but it was never the same. The autocorrect thing doesn’t work right anymore. Every time I text LOL it changes it to BOB. Ugh. Anyway, someone *cough—your son—cough* told me that when you get bored with writing you blow stuff up?

Christine: Not literally! He means that when I get stuck or lose my momentum when I’m writing, I tend to add some action to the story. I like to do unpredictable things with the narrative, like have the bad guys attack or a volcano explode or something. I like to shake things up. That way I don’t get bored and neither does the reader.

Emily: There are no exploding volcanoes in my book.

Christine: Hmmm. Well, maybe I’ll have to write a sequel—

If you’d like to read more, head on over to ARe Cafe and check out the rest! –> Emily Weaver from Disintegrate interviews her author: Christine Klocek-Lim

Starbursts and Fox Chase Review

No, no, not the candy! And not actual stars, either, although that’s the original inspiration for my poem, now appearing in Fox Chase Review, Summer 2012: “Starburst in a dwarf irregular galaxy.

In this issue you can find work by: A.D. Winans, Anthony Buccino, Elijah Pringle, Frank Wilson, James Arthur, James Quinton, Jane Lewty, Jim Mancinelli, John Dorsey, Le Hinton, Melanie Huber, Mel Brake, Nicholas Balsirow, Russell Reece, Stephen Page, and Stevie Edwards.

Fox Chase Review also did an interview with me recently: Ten Questions for Christine Klocek-Lim. In the interview I mention how much I hate doing readings. This is terribly ironic because I will also be doing a reading for Fox Chase Review next year. (Thank goodness it’s next year! Procrastination is your friend! Yeah!)

Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés — Donna Vorreyer

— a poetry interview series by Christine Klocek-Lim

Donna Vorreyer
(contributing writer at Voice Alpha)
1. What is your favorite poem that you’ve written? Read?
Written? I don’t have a favorite – that’s like choosing a favorite child. I will say that I am usually most proud of my more current poems than of older ones. I am especially fond of a series of poems I wrote last summer that were inspird by the letters of Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Lowell. They are starting to find homes – “Digging In” was featured on Linebreak earlier this year.
Read? I have a short list: “Forgotten Dialect of the Heart” by Jack Gilbert is at the top of the list, as well as “Coliseum” by Katie Ford, “At the Fishhouses” by Elizabeth Bishop, and pretty much anything by Whitman.
2. Do you think there is a disconnect between academic poets/poetry and online poets/poetry?
There shouldn’t be. But, unfortunately, I often think that there is. There can be an element of clique to those who are working/writing in academia – a “we-are-hipper-and-way-smarter-than-you” vibe that I can do without. (I see enough of that teaching 13-year-olds every day.) The community of poets in Chicago is so gloriously open and diverse that I don’t often experience this disconnect in my personal interactions with other local poets. However, I did attend my first AWP this year, and I definitely felt it there. I even had someone (who I don’t know, by the way) question why I was “bothering” to attend since I was “only a middle school teacher” and not interested in getting an MFA. So, the fact that I am active in the poetry community and have been fairly widely published and take my writing seriously seems unimportant to some. I choose to ignore those people and spend time with those, academic or not, who welcome me as a member of their word tribe.
3. Has the rise of the poetry MFA been positive or detrimental to the art?
As a teacher, it would be difficult for me to say that anything that gets people writing is detrimental to the art. I have heard others say that some MFA programs seem to be “degree mills” that don’t give honest feedback to writers who may need to be pushed to achieve quality work, but having no experience with an MFA, I’m not sure if it’s true. I’m sure that every program is different. I have some friends who highly value what they have learned in their MFA programs, and others who have dropped programs or felt them a waste of money. It certainly widens the pool of competition for publication, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing.
4. Do you write for yourself or for an audience/reader?
I write first for myself. But after a draft is born, it usually is revised with a reader in mind. If it only makes sense to me, it does not function as a means of communication, which I think a poem should do. The act of writing is an intimate and personal act. Once you decide to share that writing with the world, considering the reader is important. In the end, all poems are written for me in the sense that they teach me something about myself, about the way I see the world.
5. How much of what you write is inspiration vs. perspiration?
I draft pretty quickly, and I often use free writing and exercises to get started. The majority of my process is the perspiration part. I spend quite a bit of time revising before I show a new piece to anyone except a couple of trusted poet friends. I don’t wait until I am inspired to write, or I would never get any writing done. Free writing has been a wonderful way to get me writing nearly every day without worrying so much about the initial product.
6. How has the way you write changed (or not changed) over time? 
I used to draft, fiddle a little, and send my poems out into the world LONG before they were finished. I am more patient now, working over each line and word choice until I feel that they couldn’t be any other way. Then I put them away and wait awhile before looking at them again. Patience was a difficult thing for me to learn as a writer as I often am smitten with new things that I create. Learning to be more objective and wait has been the biggest change for me over time.
Bio:
Donna Vorreyer has traveled with her family to every continent except Antarctica and boasts an impressive collection of memories, including an excellent scar from a mountain bike crash in the Himalayas. Her poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in numerous journals including Cider Press Review, New York Quarterly, qarrtsiluni, and Rhino. Her chapbooks include: Ordering the Hours (Maverick Duck Press, Come Out, Virginia (Naked Mannekin Press), and Womb/Seed/Fruit (Finishing Line Press). Her website is: www.donnavorreyer.com and her blog is: djvorreyer.wordpress.com.
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Couplets: a multi-author poetry blog tour – click for a list of participating blogs and daily entries
Upper Rubber Boot Books is coordinating a book blog tour for April, to help promote poetry and poets for National Poetry Month. Check back here for updates throughout the month of April (we’ll also post updates to our blog, and so will many of the participating poets).
Follow this event on Facebook or Goodreads.



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Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés — John Amen

 — a poetry interview series by Christine Klocek-Lim

John Amen
(editor of The Pedestal Magazine)

1. What is your favorite poem that you’ve written? Read?

It’s hard to say what my favorite is of my own poems. I think that there have been pieces that were milestones for me, in terms of expressing something I had never expressed before or moving into a deeper level of craft. If I think of it that way, I would say that “Hiding” from Christening the Dancer was important for me as was “What I Said to Myself” from More of Me Disappears; also, my “Portraits of Mary” series from my latest book, At the Threshold of Alchemy, created new poetic, stylistic, and thematic possibilities for me as a poet.

In terms of poems that I’ve read? That’s a tough question, too. I suppose I would have to say that some of the poems I encountered in a volume called Naked Poetry (which first came out in 1969 but which I did not discover until the early 1980s when I was thirteen or fourteen) still have a hold on me. These works included poems by Robert Mezey, W.S. Merwin, and Sharon Olds among others. In addition to these works, I’ve been pretty deeply affected by the poems of the French Surrealists and the poems of John Ashbery. Of course, there are so many other poems that have been significant for me, but I suppose I’ll leave it at that.

2. Do you think there is a disconnect between academic poets/poetry and online poets/poetry?

I really don’t know. I would say that the disconnection is probably deeper than that. There are fundamental disconnections between many people and many artists; unfortunately, people in general tend to disconnect from others as a way to individuate and define themselves. So, I’m sure that there is a disconnection between this group of poets and that group of poets, but I think that the orientation towards disconnection is more fundamental that that, happens on an essential level, so that whatever divisions happen between groups are incidental to the more fundamental division we see in humanity at large.

3. Has the rise of the poetry MFA been positive or detrimental to the art?

Again, I don’t know. I suppose it has created a kind of homogeneity, as many argue. Then again, being involved in an MFA program allows someone to focus almost exclusively on his/her writing. That can’t be a bad thing. All said and done, I would probably say that the rise of MFA programs has had neither a positive nor a detrimental effect on the art of poetry. It’s one of those matters that seems to get a lot of attention, but perhaps its significance is exaggerated.

4. Do you write for yourself or for an audience/reader?

Well, both. Sometimes I am the audience, and sometimes I have an imaginary reader in mind. I’m not sure how much of a factor the “audience issue” is during the first write of a poem. I think I’m less concerned with an audience when I’m writing narrative poems. Sometimes, if I’m taking on a more surreal or non-linear approach, I do consider what the reading experience might be for someone else. This may affect how I write/edit; it may not.

5. How much of what you write is inspiration vs. perspiration?

I think many poems begin with inspiration; I think a first draft is very important, in terms of its energy. It’s difficult to edit energy into a poem; I can edit or revise the form of the poem, the phrasing, etc. Again, though, energy is a somewhat elusive quality. All said and done, I think a first draft can be successful if it’s infused with a certain energy, a sense of life, an assertion towards existence, if you will, even if there are numerous elements present that “don’t work.” So inspiration, if you want to call it that, is essential. Of course, though, a poem takes work to bring to completion, so a certain commitment to shaping it and working with it (perspiration) is pretty necessary, too.

6. Do you ever include the works of others in your readings? If not, why not? If so, who and why?

Except for a couple of occasions, I have not included the work of other poets in my readings. I’m doing a reading in April, however, in which I plan to share poems by W.S. Merwin and Robert Mezey, accompanied by a cellist. I look forward to this and think it will be a great opportunity to pay tribute to a couple of poems that had a deep impact on me as a reader, as a human being, and as a poet.

Bio:

John Amen is the author of three collections of poetry: Christening the Dancer (Uccelli Press 2003), More of Me Disappears (Cross-Cultural Communications 2005), and At the Threshold of Alchemy (Presa 2009), and has released two folk/folk rock CDs, All I’ll Never Need and Ridiculous Empire (Cool Midget 2004, 2008). His poetry has appeared in various journals and anthologies, including, most recently, Rattle, The New York Quarterly, The International Poetry Review, Gargoyle, and Blood to Remember. He is also an artist, working primarily with acrylics on canvas. Amen travels widely giving readings, doing musical performances, and conducting workshops. He founded and continues to edit the award-winning literary bimonthly, The Pedestal Magazine (www.thepedestalmagazine.com).

Readings:
John Amen is doing a series of readings in April. Please click the link to view his itinerary: www.johnamen.com – schedule.

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Couplets: a multi-author poetry blog tour – click for a list of participating blogs and daily entries
Upper Rubber Boot Books is coordinating a book blog tour for April, to help promote poetry and poets for National Poetry Month. Check back here for updates throughout the month of April (we’ll also post updates to our blog, and so will many of the participating poets).
Follow this event on Facebook or Goodreads.



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Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés — Karen J. Weyant

— a poetry interview series by Christine Klocek-Lim




Karen J. Weyant

1. What is your favorite poem that you’ve written? Read? 

My favorite poem that I have every written is called “The Inevitable” – which took about three years to write and revise.  It was originally published in The Fourth River, but also appears in Wearing Heels in the Rust Belt.  However, I have to add, that when I do readings, audience members seem to really like “Roadkill Girls” originally published in The Fiddleback

It’s funny, but if you were to ask me my favorite of anything else, such as my favorite song or my favorite movie, I would stumble, but I know my favorite poem of all time is “Feared Drowned” by Sharon Olds.  This work displays stark and beautiful imagery, with an overall theme that  we can never find what has once been lost.  It’s a beautiful poem. 


2. Do you think there is a disconnect between academic poets/poetry and online poets/poetry? 

I’m afraid that I don’t know what really defines an “academic poet.”  I know that some poets who teach at publish-or-perish institutions have to publish in the “right places” and those right places often do not include online journals. Unfortunately, I believe there is still a mistrust in poetry that is published online, and I’m not sure why.  Poetry, like all art, must evolve and we cannot escape the Internet.  From a more practical standpoint, I find online journals wonderful teaching tools in the classroom.  I teach at a rural community college, and it’s wonderful to take my students to the computer lab and show them beautiful online journals such as diode.

But maybe that disconnect is fading.  Some of my favorite poets writing today, including Mary Biddinger, Jeannine Hall Gailey, Dorianne Laux, and Traci Brimhall, publish online and in print journals.  


3. Has the rise of the poetry MFA been positive or detrimental to the art? 

I guess I have to preface this answer by explaining that I don’t have an MFA, but I have many friends who are great poets and do have MFAs. So, I guess in some aspects, I know both sides.  I do not believe that there are too many MFA programs, nor do I believe these programs are detrimental to the arts.  In fact, there is a big  part of me that finds all the arguments a bit tiresome.  Why not use all this time (and words) to discuss poetry as an art form?  Or how to get more people to read poetry?  In general, I just don’t understand how programs that encourage a love of any art can be detrimental.


4. Do you write for yourself or for an audience/reader? 

I teach rhetoric and composition and I always tell my students that audience is a very important part of any type of writing.  Perhaps, that is why I write narrative poetry – I want my readers to know the people and places found in my poems.  So yes, I write for an audience who wants to hear stories, but because of the subjects of my poems, I also write for audiences who knows the blue collar/working-class world or who want to know this world.  

However, I wouldn’t be truthful if I didn’t say that there is a small part of me that feels a huge desire to capture the stories of working-class/blue collar/rural women.  Even if no one in the world wanted to hear these narratives, I would still write them! 


5. How much of what you write is inspiration vs. perspiration? 

Writing, for me, is mostly perspiration. There are many days that I struggle with even getting one line right in a poem.  In general, I am a slow writer and a slower reviser, and I admire my peers who seemingly write a whole chapbook in a month, a great collection in less than a year.  I wish that I had ideas in the same way that cartoon characters are inspired with magical light bulbs over their head, but that rarely happens with me. Instead, I have to force myself to sit down and face an empty notebook or a blank computer screen, write, and then not be too hard on myself when the immediate work that comes out is not inspired or polished. 


6. How has the way you write changed (or not changed) over time? 

Physically, I find myself approaching writing differently.  I used to draft everything on paper.  Now, while I still draft in small, cheap (I love Dollar Stores) journals, I find myself heading to the computer screen faster.  I also take more chances with my writing, with both language and subject matter.  I attribute this change to the fact that I write more now than I did ten years ago, but I also read everything I can get my hands on.  It’s the number one piece of advice I give to my students who want to write – read! 


Bio:

Karen J. Weyant’s most recent work can be seen in Cave Wall, Conte, Copper Nickel, The Tusculum Review, and River Styx.  Her poem, “The Summer I Stopped Catching Bees” recently appeared in Sundress Publications’ 2011 Best of the Net.  She is the author of two chapbooks, Stealing Dust (Finishing Line Press, 2009) and Wearing Heels in the Rust Belt (Winner of Main Street Rag’s 2011 Chapbook Contest).  She lives in Western Pennsylvania, but crosses the border to teach at Jamestown Community College in Jamestown, New York.  She blogs at www.thescrapperpoet.wordpress.com.


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Couplets: a multi-author poetry blog tour – click for a list of participating blogs and daily entries
Upper Rubber Boot Books is coordinating a book blog tour for April, to help promote poetry and poets for National Poetry Month. Check back here for updates throughout the month of April (we’ll also post updates to our blog, and so will many of the participating poets).
Follow this event on Facebook or Goodreads.



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Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés — O.P.W. Fredericks

— a poetry interview series by Christine Klocek-Lim



O.P.W. Fredericks

1. What is your favorite poem that you’ve written? Read?

I must preface that my answers to both parts of this question are a bit biased.  “Serenade” is my favorite poem that I’ve written because it is a love poem I wrote to my partner, Daniel Milbo, for Valentine’s Day in 2009.  A few weeks later I reprinted it on linen paper and then had it framed for him as a gift.  For me, it is my best work, though I’ve never been satisfied with the poem’s final verse.  I’ve often recited it in my mind as I’ve tried to find something better, but Daniel will never allow me to change it.  To my horror, I found a typo in the framed poem when I read it where it hangs on the wall this past winter.

My answer to the second part of this question also involves Daniel and is based on a very personal event.  The favorite poem that I’ve read has never been, nor ever will be published.  It is titled “Soldier, Come Home,” and it was written for me by Daniel when I began my transition into retirement from nursing in the autumn of 2007.  As I walked into our dining room upon my arrival home after the final day of working full-time as a nurse, I found what appeared to be a framed document at my place on the dining room table.  Unsuspecting, I began to read it when I suddenly realized it was a poem.  It made me cry with the intensity of a cry of release, an unburdening that came from the depths of my soul.  The poem is about the ending of a phase of life and the transition into a new one.  It begins with my life as a caregiver, and the professional and personal challenges, trials, and sacrifices I had experienced and made as a nurse after 30 years at the bedside.  As the poem progresses, it beckons for me to accept the transition and then invites me to rest, recover, and look forward to an unencumbered future.  After I recovered, I discovered (with Daniel’s help) a second poem hidden within the frame, titled “Over The Threshold,” and I cried again with even more emotion.  This poem was about a new beginning.  It recounted all my dreams for the future, all the things I had shared with Daniel; and it reiterated his ongoing desire for me to reach for those dreams and his unwavering support of me to achieve them.  I then realized that the contents of that frame represented the greatest gift I had ever received.

To continue along the lines of what I believe to be the intention of this question, I have read many, many poems on my own and thousands more that have been submitted to our journal and press.  I have a folder on my computer that contains between 90 and 100 poems that have moved, amused, or inspired me, but I’ll list only the following poems because they immediately come to mind.

Do not go gentle into that good night” by Dylan Thomas to which I wrote my first attempt at a glose or glosa, titled “Daddy’s battles,” in response to a challenge offered by Colin Ward on the Poets.org workshop forum.  I think it was one of the 2009 offerings in my NaPoWriMo (National Poetry Writing Month) Poets.org thread.  Also included are:

Blow, Healing Wind” by Esther Greenleaf Mürer
Dirt” by Catherine Rogers
Door Card” by James S. Wilk
Dying” by Stephen Bunch
Final Night” by Tina Hacker
Grasshopper” a DATIA sonnet by Colin Ward
I See God Standing in Stout Grove” by Larina Warnock
Night Shift” by Ed Bennett
No Possum, No Aesop, No ‘Gators” by Stephen Bunch
“Pass on: to give a thing that has been given,” a never published poem written for me by Larina Warnock
no link

The Quilters of Gee’s Bend” by Alarie Tennille
Studying Savonarola” by M.A. Griffiths
The unnamed” by Christine Klocek-Lim

2. Do you think there is a disconnect between academic poets/poetry and online poets/poetry?

Not so much a disconnect or disparity as there is a difference in their approach to poetry.  Also, because I am not an academic, I would have to say that my opinion is inherently biased.  I have found that academic poets more often tend to focus first on craft while online poets more often tend to focus first on content.  Unfortunately, sometimes that’s where the focus ends.  I also find it admirable to a degree that because of the medium in which they are most familiar, each group inherently tends to gravitate towards “home.”  There are large numbers of online poets who seek criticism of their work in open forums where their poetry is exposed to comments from anyone.  I have no evidence to suggest that academic poets, on the whole, do the same, but I have learned that they do seek critique from their academic colleagues.  I do understand that like tends to seek out and attract like, but for either, this can result in a stagnation of the critiquing pool.  Regardless of their background, poets who can connect to an audience achieve the greatest success.

Simply put, I think that these two groups represent two different poetry factions and that there is a tendency for them to want to remain that way, but I do occasionally see crossovers and merging between the two.  This is not to say that there aren’t internet poets whose work has rivaled the level of craft achieved by the academics.  A few of these that come to mind are the late Margaret A Griffiths, Christine Klocek-Lim, Colin Ward, and Larina Warnock.  Nor does this mean that there aren’t those academic poets whose poetry is infused with accessible content allowing their work to connect to a wide audience.  When you encounter the work of a poet like Catherine Rogers, you experience the best of both worlds.


3. Has the rise of the poetry MFA been positive or detrimental to the art?

In general, the positive effects of the rise in MFA’s are an expanding awareness of literature, an increased desire to excel in communicating thoughts and ideas, and an overall elevation in the desire to possess the ability to comprehend the intention of language through the written word.

I can’t say that I believe the possession of a MFA has been detrimental to the art of poetry, but I was surprised to learn a few things about the writing skills of some and the degree to which those skills were lacking.  My impression is based on my experience with the work we’ve received from MFA candidates and those who hold a MFA because my expectations are much higher for someone who would possess such a degree.  I was surprised to learn that some MFA’s / candidates believed that the possession or pursuit of the degree automatically elevated their work to the level of art, qualified their work for acceptance for publication regardless of whether it met a publication’s requirements, submitted work that did not adhere to the basic rules of grammar, or understood the difference in meaning between homophones.


4. Do you write for yourself or for an audience/reader?

I write for both at different times though I rarely begin a piece with an audience in mind.  More often, a piece begins as a personal endeavor, then at some point, usually quite later, I might consider whether it has the potential to be transformed into something that could be appreciated by an audience.


5. How much of what you write is inspiration vs. perspiration?

Considering question #4, I’d say 75% inspiration and 25% perspiration.  I say this because starting a poem is my greatest challenge.  I’ll often have an idea floating around in my mind for days that begins with the need for an emotion to be expressed.  Sometimes it will submerge itself into my sub-conscience to mature until it’s ready to reveal itself.  When this happens, putting it to paper becomes an all-consuming focus.

The annual NaPoWriMo challenge would be an exception to this.  Participation in this endeavor often garners rough or very rough poem drafts that I will return to later in the year.  It forces me to write, whether I think I have something to say or not.


6. If you were a Celtic bard, carrying poems from place to place as if they were the last flame, which ones would you sing?

As a Celtic bard, the poems I would carry would begin with my list in question #1 and end with those in the folder on my computer.


Anything else you’d like to say?

In closing, I have found that I have a greater affinity for poetry editing than poetry writing.  Daniel’s poem, “Over the Threshold,” helped me to realize that the focus of my life has been to contribute to the efforts of others by helping them to achieve their goals and reach their potential.  As a nurse, I enter people’s lives at moments when their life’s journeys are interrupted or their journey in this life is coming to an end.  My skills and efforts help those who are detoured from their journey to return to the course they were traveling.  For those whose journeys are ending, I help them to remember what they have achieved, take pride in their accomplishments, and realize how they have affected and made differences in the lives they have touched along the way.  With regard to poetry, I realized there were many parallels between my vocation in nursing and what I might hope to contribute to poetry.

As an editor, I try to understand not only the message and meaning of a poem but also the intention of the poet who wrote it.  I do this by assuming the role of a reader and communicator.  When I read a poem, I try to decipher its message, determine how well it conveys its message, and document how it went about achieving that.  Then the editor in me begins to creep in as I consider different or more effective ways that a poet may use to convey the message.

To be successful as a nurse, one must be able to communicate information succinctly, directly, and quickly and in a way that recipients can understand, incorporate it into their lives, and make their own.  Successful poets do much the same.

When I returned to writing 10 years ago, I began by writing prose.  Then, in April 2007, I discovered Poets.org which presented me with the opportunity to return to writing poetry, something I had not done in many years.  Within a short period of time, I realized that I was able to identify the difficulties other poets were having with conveying the intention of their poems more than I was able to identify it in my own work.  After a time, I realized that this revelation was not unique to myself, but it led to my desire to help other poets reach their potential and be recognized for their work.

Bio:

O.P.W. Fredericks is a Registered Nurse from Pennsylvania who is transitioning into retirement.  His clinical practice encompassed medical-surgical, intensive care, and emergency nursing.   He was a volunteer paramedic for twenty-two years.  He returned to creative writing in 2002 after a hiatus of several decades.  His poetry and short stories reflect human interaction and the human condition interpreted by his philosophy of life as well as recollections from his career, his childhood, and his observations of the natural world.  He currently serves as a moderator and the assistant administrator for the Academy of American Poets Poetry Workshop Forum.  He is the editor and publisher of Touch: The Journal of Healing and The Lives You Touch Publications.  His poetry has appeared in The Externalist: A Journal of Perspectives, Autumn Sky Poetry, and Philadelphia Poets.


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Couplets: a multi-author poetry blog tour – click for a list of participating blogs and daily entries
Upper Rubber Boot Books is coordinating a book blog tour for April, to help promote poetry and poets for National Poetry Month. Check back here for updates throughout the month of April (we’ll also post updates to our blog, and so will many of the participating poets).
Follow this event on Facebook or Goodreads.






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