Dark Matter poems featured at Nautilus — Cosmos

nautilus-cosmos-astro-pic

I’m very excited to present a selection of poems from my book, Dark Matter, at Nautilus, for their Cosmos issue, along with some brief commentary by yours truly.

Click through to Nautilus — Cosmos, and then scroll down to choose: The Stars Are a Comforting Constant.

Hat tips to Aldrich Press, 3 Quarks Daily, and the Ellen La Forge Memorial Prize in Poetry. A very special thanks to George Musser Jr. to reaching out to me, and Regan Penaluna for the finishing touches.

front cover

September 2015 – Aldrich Press/Kelsay Books

buy link: Amazon

 

An earlier version of Dark Matter won the following prizes: 

2009 Ellen La Forge Poetry Prize (formerly the Grolier Prize) for poems: “Star explodes halfway across universe,” “Saturn’s moon may have hidden seas,” “Smallest black hole found,” “How to search for aliens,” “Mysterious white rock fingers on Mars,” and “Three galaxies and a comet.”

2009 semi-finalist in the Philip Levine Prize in Poetry.

2009 semi-finalist in the University of Wisconsin Press Poetry Series, Brittingham and Pollak Poetry Prizes.

2009 semi-finalist for the Sawtooth Poetry Prize, Ahsahta Press, Boise State University.

2010 semi-finalist for the Crab Orchard Series in Poetry First Book Award Competition.

 

 

First Crocus of 2016

I think the rabbits ate the purple crocus. There are still a few green shoots with no blooms just yet, so we shall see….

First Crocus

This morning, flowers cracked open
the earth’s brown shell. Spring
leaves spilled everywhere
though winter’s stern hand
could come down again at any moment
to break the delicate yolk
of a new bloom.

The crocus don’t see this as they chatter
beneath a cheerful petal of spring sky.
They ignore the air’s brisk arm
as they peer at their fresh stems, step
on the leftover fragments
of old leaves.

When the night wind twists them to pieces,
they will die like this: laughing,
tossing their brilliant heads
in the bitter air.

—first published at About.com in 2007

Who Saw the Deep – a sci-fi mystery

 

Poetry isn’t the only thing I’ve written over the years. In 2013, my sci-fi mystery novel, WHO SAW THE DEEP, was released! I loved writing this book and it remains one of my favorites out of all the words I’ve put to page in my life. If you would like a copy, the buy links are below.

buy links: Evernight – Amazon Kindle – OmniLit – BookStrand – Smashwords – Barnes & Noble – iBookstore – Kobo

WSTD2  epeditorsesal1s

Suspense, Paranormal, Sci-Fi, Mystery
Word Count: 55,000
Published By: Evernight Publishing

Click here to read an excerpt.

When Noah moves back home after grad school, he doesn’t expect a simple handyman job to turn deadly. Amelia seems like a sweet old lady with a run-down house, but appearances can be deceptive. When an alien ship lands in her woods, Noah discovers that everything he believed about Earth and human civilization is wrong.

Amelia already gave her heart to one man—does she really want to let another one inside? Even though Noah is everything she ever wanted, can she really trust him? He seems like a good person, but her family’s genetic legacy is more important than romance.

When all their secrets are laid bare, Noah and Amelia discover that the survival of their species may be more dependent on love than either could have imagined. Civilization endures because of anonymous acts executed by ordinary individuals. And love, especially in the face of betrayal, is worth everything.

Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award (ABNA) 2012 Semi-Finalist Winner!

What are people saying about Who Saw the Deep?

“This novel is well written, original, and clever. … It’s a pity to classify this book as science fiction; it reads more like the ancient myths, or even fairy tales.” – Publishers Weekly Review

“The characterization in this novel is slow and subtle at first, but eventually even the smallest clues are tied together in ways that I never would have anticipated. … Ms. Lim knows exactly how to paint a thin veneer of dread over what otherwise appears to be a perfectly ordinary day, and her ability to find the dark underbelly of even the most mundane chores and experiences plays a large part in why this tale earned such a high rating.” – Long and Short Reviews – 4.5 stars

~~~~~

goodreads-logo

My goodreads giveaway for my full length poetry collection is over and two lucky people will be receiving their books in the mail soon. If you would like a copy of my poetry, here is the buy link: Amazon

front cover

12 Days of Catmas

Yes. It is time to post this again. 😉

12 days of Catmas

12 days of Catmas

On the first day of Christmas
my two cats gave to me
a dingleberry in a pine tree.

On the second day of Christmas
my two cats gave to me
two hair balls,
and a dingleberry in a pine tree.

On the third day of Christmas
my two cats gave to me
three dead mice,
two hair balls,
and a dingleberry in a pine tree.

On the fourth day of Christmas
my two cats gave to me
four pathetic howls,
three dead mice,
two hair balls,
and a dingleberry in a pine tree.

On the fifth day of Christmas
my two cats gave to me
five piles of poo,
four pathetic howls,
three dead mice,
two hair balls,
and a dingleberry in a pine tree.

On the sixth day of Christmas
my two cats gave to me
six stinging scratches,
five piles of poo,
four pathetic howls,
three dead mice,
two hair balls,
and a dingleberry in a pine tree.

On the seventh day of Christmas
my two cats gave to me
seven shredded sparrows,
six stinging scratches,
five piles of poo,
four pathetic howls,
three dead mice,
two hair balls,
and a dingleberry in a pine tree.

On the eighth day of Christmas
my two cats gave to me
eight hissy fits,
seven shredded sparrows,
six stinging scratches,
five piles of poo,
four pathetic howls,
three dead mice,
two hair balls,
and a dingleberry in a pine tree.

On the ninth day of Christmas
my two cats gave to me
nine fishy farts,
eight hissy fits,
seven shredded sparrows,
six stinging scratches,
five piles of poo,
four pathetic howls,
three dead mice,
two hair balls,
and a dingleberry in a pine tree.

On the tenth day of Christmas
my two cats gave to me
ten tons of fur,
nine fishy farts,
eight hissy fits,
seven shredded sparrows,
six stinging scratches,
five piles of poo,
four pathetic howls,
three dead mice,
two hair balls,
and a dingleberry in a pine tree.

On the eleventh day of Christmas
my two cats gave to me
eleven spitting kittens,
ten tons of fur,
nine fishy farts,
eight hissy fits,
seven shredded sparrows,
six stinging scratches,
five piles of poo,
four pathetic howls,
three dead mice,
two hair balls,
and a dingleberry in a pine tree.

On the twelfth day of Christmas
my two cats gave to me
twelve stolen salmon,
eleven spitting kittens,
ten tons of fur,
nine fishy farts,
eight hissy fits,
seven shredded sparrows,
six stinging scratches,
five piles of poo,
four pathetic howls,
three dead mice,
two hair balls,
and a dingleberry in a pine tree.

 

© 2011 Christine Klocek-Lim

goodreads giveaway for Dark Matter! #poems

goodreads-logo

Love to read poetry but your budget is tight? I’m giving away two signed copies!

Click here to enter the goodreads giveaway for Dark Matter!

 

front cover

My full length collection of astronomy poems is now available! Many thanks to Karen at Aldrich Press/Kelsay Books!

buy link: Amazon

This particular collection was written over the past seven years. All the poems are based on images from the Astronomy Picture of the Day website: APOD.

I’m posting a previously unpublished poem from the collection. It’s not a supermoon eclipse, but it seemed appropriate, given last night’s astronomical party.

Blue moon eclipse 

This blue moon is pink
and strange—
like a pearl stuck in a grey
tideless ocean. She doesn’t move.
We’re wet and tired and we face
the sky like shells turned upside down.
The sand grits our teeth.

Or perhaps we’re in the mountains—
Rhône, France. Maybe the Rockies
where trees and stones hide almost all the view.
The vast night is portioned into tiny pieces:
here a bit of star, there a cloud.
The moon sails by
too fast—

This is what happens in the wild—
wolves let loose in the forest,
the pink blue moon, inciting confusion.
I ask why we are here
and you reply: because she is beautiful. 

This blue moon is not blue
at all.

When she fades (pearly craters
dimmed with sleep) we lie
on the ground like rocks turned over:
dark side up, hands threaded
with dream-dust.

 

Full Moon Silhouettes nominated for a Pushcart Prize!

Kelsay Books/Aldrich Press nominated my poem, Full Moon Silhouettes, for a Pushcart Prize! Thank you so much, Karen!

buy link: Amazon

front cover

 

This particular collection was written over the past seven years. All the poems are based on images from the Astronomy Picture of the Day website: APOD.

 

Dark Matter is available! #poems

buy link: Amazon

front cover

My full length collection of astronomy poems is now available! Many thanks to Karen at Aldrich Press/Kelsay Books!

buy link: Amazon

This particular collection was written over the past seven years. All the poems are based on images from the Astronomy Picture of the Day website: APOD.

I’m posting a previously unpublished poem from the collection. It’s not a supermoon eclipse, but it seemed appropriate, given last night’s astronomical party.

Blue moon eclipse 

This blue moon is pink
and strange—
like a pearl stuck in a grey
tideless ocean. She doesn’t move.
We’re wet and tired and we face
the sky like shells turned upside down.
The sand grits our teeth.

Or perhaps we’re in the mountains—
Rhône, France. Maybe the Rockies
where trees and stones hide almost all the view.
The vast night is portioned into tiny pieces:
here a bit of star, there a cloud.
The moon sails by
too fast—

This is what happens in the wild—
wolves let loose in the forest,
the pink blue moon, inciting confusion.
I ask why we are here
and you reply: because she is beautiful. 

This blue moon is not blue
at all.

When she fades (pearly craters
dimmed with sleep) we lie
on the ground like rocks turned over:
dark side up, hands threaded
with dream-dust.